Swayam- Passively Stabilized Communication Satellite

The COEP Satellite Initiative team from College of Engineering, Pune received the award for the project 'Swayam- Passively Stabilized Communication Satellite'. They carried their project work under the guidance of Dr. M. Y. Khaladkar and Dr. B. B. Ahuja.

Swayam is a pico-satellite developed by undergraduate students of College of Engineering, Pune. Swayam is a passively stabilized communication satellite of dimensions 10 X 10 X 11.35 cm and mass 990 g. Swayam was launched by ISRO on 22nd June, 2016 by PSLVC34. Swayam is currently in-orbit and data is being downlinked at COEP ground station and analysed on a regular basis. Student satellites offer a distinct challenge in terms of reliability and interdisciplinary nature of design. To achieve the highest standards of design and fabrication, the project was organized into five constituent subsystems. Attitude control is achieved by a passive magnetic attitude control system to satisfy the space and energy constraints. This system consists of an orthogonal arrangement of magnet and hysteresis rods. Volume, strength and placement of magnetic materials are the major design considerations. A numerical simulation has been developed to conclude the effect of various design parameters on stabilization time and its feasibility for the communication payload. Swayam has a half-duplex communication subsystem. Beam of the antenna is optimized to offer maximum communication link time in conjunction with the available pointing accuracy. To satisfy the power budget of the satellite, the autonomously sent beacon is sent at lesser power than the digital payload data. The power subsystem of the satellite is fully analog capable of functioning independently. Swayam as a template is ideal for carrying low profile payloads which do not require magnetically clean environment. Swayam is also an experiment which shows the cohesive application of passive stabilization for a communication satellite in low power environment.

For this innovation Dr. Anil Sahasrabudhe, Chairman of the All India Council for Technical Education, honored team COEP Satellite Initiative, with the prestigious Gandhian Young Technological Innovation (GYTI) Award 2017 at Rashtrapati Bhavan.

A Novel Bio-engineering Approach to Generate an Eminent Surface Functionalized Template for the Selective Detection of Female Sex Pheromone of Certain Agriculturally Hazardous

Dr. Parikshit Moitra and Dr. Deepa Bhagat from Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru were given the Gandhian Young Technological Innovation Award-2017 for developing a prototype of A Novel Bio-engineering Approach to Generate an Eminent Surface Functionalized Template for the Selective Detection of Female Sex Pheromone of Certain Agriculturally Hazardous under guidancep of Prof. Santanu Bhattacharya.

Plant pests exert serious effects on food production due to which the global crop yields are reduced by ~20-40% per year, as estimated by FAO. Hence to meet the world's food needs, loses of food due to crop pestsmust be reduced. Herein silicon dioxide or zinc oxide based MEMS devices are covalently functionalized for robust and efficient optical sensing of the female sex pheromones of the pests like Helicoverpa armigera, Scirpophaga incertulas and Bactocera oleae for the first time in literature.A Novel Bio-engineering Approach to Generate an Eminent Surface Functionalized Template for the Selective Detection of Female Sex Pheromone of Certain Agriculturally Hazardous

The relative sensitivity of the functionalized MEMS devices is improved by the variation in functionalization protocols that either increased the number of amine or β-cyclodextrin functionalities on each anchor site. The functionalized devices are also capable of selectively measur ing the concentration of this pheromone at the femtogram level which is much below the concentration of pheromone found at the time of pest infestation in an agricultural field. Again, the reversible use of the functionalized devices in any season under ambient conditions, photochemical and thermal stability of the devi c e s and absolut e ly t roubl e f r e e transportation of these pheromone nanosensors heightens their potentials for commercial use. Overall, a novel and unique approach is reported herein for the selective and reversible sensing of female sex pheromones of certain hazardous pests which may be efficiently and economically carried forward from the research laboratory to the agricultural field to determine the stage of prior pest infestation. Necessary actions can then be taken as and when necessary in a confined region of alerted pest attack.

Dr. R A Mashelkar, Chairperson, Research Advisory Committee, SRISTI and NIF, honored Dr. Parikshit Moitra, Department of Agricultural Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru, with the prestigious Gandhian Young Technological Innovation (GYTI) Award 2017 at a function held at Rashtrapati Bhawan on March 5.

Navyo – The Smart Glove

Madhav Aggarwal, Mohd. Suhail and Bhavesh Pachnanda, Students of the Delhi Technological University, Delhi were given the Gandhian Young Technological Innovation Award-2017 for developing a prototype of a Navyo – The Smart Glove under guidance of  Dr. Vikas Rastogi.

In the midst of the fast paced life and era of technology, a blind person is still in state of confusion that how will he/she manage to reach his/her destination. Due to his/her impairment, he/she is unable to find his direction (i.e. from where to take a left or a right turn) and eventually gets lost every now and then. So, another person becomes necessary for guiding him along the path. This makes him/her highly dependent on others for his mobility.

Navyo the smart gloveWith this, not only does he reduce his productivity but also, loses his freedom and confidence to walk alone. So, to cater the aforementioned problem a smart glove that will guide the person turn by turn to reach the destination via vibrations is created. Navyo is accompanied by a mobile App, interface of which is simple and easy to use. User simply needs to speak out the destination in App. Navyo then connects to app via Bluetooth and the person is ready to go. As per the map, when the left turn approaches, the frequency of vibration also starts increasing in left portion of hand indicating left turn and stops when turn is taken. This way by following different vibration patterns at different maneuver points (i.e. right turn, overhead bridges, underpass etc) destination can be reached out easily. In case, user has missed out any vibration instruction on glove, then it can be repeated by simply pressing a button on Navyo. The solution is based on haptic feedback technology which is safe and non-distractive from blind person's point of view. Also, this solution provides the hassle-free way for navigation by allowing user to speak the destination and walk with mobile phone inside pocket/purse etc.

Dr. Francis Gurry Director General of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) honored Madhav Aggarwal, Department of Electronics, Communications & related fields, Delhi Technological University, Delhi, with the prestigious Gandhian Young Technological Innovation (GYTI) Award 2017 at a function held at Rashtrapati Bhawan on March 5.

 

Non-invasive, Point-of-care Diagnostic System for Early Detection of Oral Cancer using Digital Infrared Thermal Imaging

Manashi Chakraborty, Dr. Santanu Patsa and Dr. Nishat Anjum received the award for the research project Non-invasive, Point-of-care Diagnostic System for Early Detection of Oral Cancer using Digital Infrared Thermal Imaging. She carried her research work under the guidance of  Dr. Sudipa Mukhopadhyay, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur.

This project is the pioneering attempt to develop a non-invasive, non-ionizing, radiation hazard free, point-of-care computer aided diagnostic framework for oral cancer detection using machine intelligence and Digital Infrared Thermal Imaging (DITI). Oral cancer is the most common cancer in India where approximately 14 people die/hour. Patients are unable to avail diagnosis due to scarcity of state-of-the-art infrastructure and oral-pathologist. Patients are reluctant to go for invasive biopsy. All these along with absence of screening facility pose hindrance to early diagnosis. Due to abnormal metabolic activities in carcinogenic facial regions, heat signatures of patients are different from that of normal subjects. Asymmetry of temperature distribution was compared between facial regions (opposite sides of frontal image and between left and right profile images) for patients and normal subjects.

Disparity_AnalysisThe analysis suggested that patients manifest greater asymmetry compared to normal subjects. This project requires only a one-time investment of a long infrared thermal camera, image processing and machine learning software and a laptop/workstation. Thus, there is minimal resource requirement. Also, Digital Infrared Thermal Imaging (DITI) has no recurring or maintenance cost. The image acquisition protocol is so simple that even a high school student can acquire the images. It provides on-spot oralcancer screening facility and is portable. Thus, screening camps can be organised even in remote villages with minimal infrastructure. As DITI has no recurring cost, it can be scaled up to cater the huge population of developing countries like India.

Dr. Prof. K. Vijay Raghavan Secretary, Department of Biotechnology, honored Manashi Chakraborty, Department of Medical Science & Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, with the prestigious BIRAC-SRISTI Gandhian Young Technological Innovation (GYTI) Award 2017 at a function held at Rashtrapati Bhavan on March 5.

 

Affordable detection kit for Cervical Cancer

Appidi Tejaswini, Syed Basseruddin Alvi , Anurag Meena Students of the Indian Institute of Technology, Hyderabad were given the BIRAC-SRISTI Gandhian Young Technological Innovation Award-2017 for developing a prototype of an Affordable detection kit for Cervical Cancer under guidance Dr. Aravind Kumar Rengan.

Cervical cancer is treatable, if diagnosed early. The screening/diagnostic procedures available are time-consuming and explorative. A system which is simple, economical with immediate results is needed to increase frequency of screening. The innovation has paved way for the development of one such system.

Strip based device for detetcion(2)A technique is developed to quantify the acetic acid that is used for protein coagulation which is responsible for the aceto-white patches in VIA [Visual Inspection with Acetic acid, a conventional screening procedure for detection of Cervical cancer/Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)]. The percentage of acetic acid is quantified; such that various percentages would result in various colors. This will help to identify the presence of cervical cancer/CIN without naked eye observation as required in VIA. This technique will be embedded into a paper/strip based device which can be initially used as an assistive technique but has the capability to emerge as self-screening tool. A qualitative screening procedure VIA is also quantified which can be easily embedded into paper/strip based device for the development of an economical, easy to handle kit which will increase the frequency and improve the ease of screening which would in turn increase the Cervical cancer survival rate.

For this innovation Dr. Renu Swarup Senior Advisor, DBT and MD, BIRAC, honored Appidi Tejaswini, Department of Nano Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Hyderabad, with the prestigious BIRAC-SRISTI Gandhian Young Technological Innovation (GYTI) Award 2017 at Rashtrapati Bhavan on March 5.

 

Portable Biosensing Platform Based on Conducting Polymer Decorated Optical Fiber for Bacteria as well as Heavy Metal Sensing in Tap Water

Sutapa Chandra, Rosna Binish, Arvind Dhawangale students of the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay were given the BIRAC-SRISTI Gandhian Young Technological Innovation Award-2017 for developing a prototype of a Portable Biosensing Platform Based on Conducting Polymer Decorated Optical Fiber for Bacteria as well as Heavy Metal Sensing in Tap Water under guidance of Prof. Soumyo Mukherji.

The presence of water borne bacteria and heavy metals in tap water could be a potential human health risk and may lead to death of young children and adult. To address this issue, a common platform is developed for detection of water contaminants (bacteria and heavy metals) in tap water. The primary sensing mechanism is based on change of optical properties of polyaniline (conducting polymer) due to the binding of water contaminants on the polyaniline coated fiberoptic sensor probe. The experimental setup consists of a broadband light source, light focusing optics and fiber-optic spectrometer. Depending on the analyte (heavy metals, bacteria etc.), polyaniline coated optical fibers were functionalized with different receptors. Thus, by changing the surface chemistry of the polyaniline coated sensor probe, it can be made specific towards detection of different analyte. As a proof of concept, it is demonstrated that as low as 20- 60 cfu/ml concentrations of E. coli and 1 picomolar concentration of lead ions are detectable using this system.

sutapa chandraThe deliverable will be a marketable prototype of an optical fiber sensor integrated with microcontroller unit. The novelty lies in the alteration of optical properties of polyaniline and its utilisation for water contaminants sensing. The detection limit aimed by this technology will surpass the conventional methods available for detecting these analytes. The sensitivity and specificity available by this technology ensures its applicability in water industry.

For this innovation Dr. R A Mashelkar, Chairperson, Research Advisory Committee, SRISTI and NIF, honored Sutapa Chandra, Department of Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, with the prestigious BIRAC-SRISTI Gandhian Young Technological Innovation (GYTI) Award 2017 at Rashtrapati Bhavan on March 5.

Affordable and Rapid Paper-based Test Kits for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Assays

Students of the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur were received the BIRAC-SRISTI Gandhian Young Technological Innovation Award-2017 for developing a prototype of an Affordable and Rapid Paper-based Test Kits for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Assays.

Shantimoy Kar including team members Tarun Agarwal, Shubhanath Behera, Varun Varma developed this test kit under guidence of Dr. Suman Chakraborty and Prof. Tapas K. Maiti. At the present scenario, increasing drug resistance of the pathogenic microbes is a global threat to the human mortality. To meet this challenge, there is a need to develop a rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing platform. The cur rent methodologies for detec ting antimicrobial susceptibility suffer from severe limitations, thereby negatively effecting patient's survival rates. These techniques are time consuming, labor intensive, require sophisticated infrastructures and skilled personnel; which collectively increase overall cost of the diagnosis. In this context, herein, a simple paper based microfluidics platform for easy and rapid execution of antimicrobial susceptibility assays is developed.

Device schematicsThe device consists of a paper-based platform which includes four different layers: a base layer, a bacterial suspension layer, a drug layer and a top layer containing a chromogenic substrate which changes color in accordance to the bacterial metabolic activities. The developed technology provides faster detection (~ 5-6 h) and multiplexing (upto 8 different samples could be analyzed) in comparison to the gold-standard stereotype laboratory practices. Moreover, portable nature and ease of fabrication method collectively make it more convenient for functioning at resource limited settings.

For this innovation Prof. Anil K Gupta Co-ordinator, SRISTI and Founder, Honey Bee Network, honored Shantimoy Kar and team Tarun Agarwal, Shubhanath Behera, Varun Varma, Department of Applied Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, with the prestigious BIRAC-SRISTI Gandhian Young Technological Innovation (GYTI) Award 2017 at Rashtrapati Bhavan.

NeuroBuds: Brain Wave Mapping Smart Earphones for Rural India

Nitin Vasanth, student of the Cochin University of Science & Technology, Cochin received the BIRAC – SRISTI Gandhian Young Technological Innovation Award-2017 for developing a prototype of a NeuroBuds: Brain Wave Mapping Smart Earphones for Rural India under the guidance of Prof. Unni A M.

NeuroBuds PrototypeAn average human brain consists of over 80 billion neurons. These communicate with each other by sending short ionic impulses, which in turn creates small voltage fluctuations around the proximity of brain. By placing highly sensitive sensors, these fluctuations can be used to understand the brain activity. NeuroBuds is a pair of smart earphones that have these specially fabricated sensors embedded into it to understand the brain activity of user. These sensors are integrated into the architecture of an earphone along with a pre-processor. The data from the sensor is passed on to the Smartphone from where the rest of processing is done. This way of utilization of smartphone processor and smartphone battery to power NeuroBuds reduces the requirement for dedicated on-board processor and battery module reducing the size of device greatly. More importantly this helps reduce the device cost to a price point that makes it accessible to common man who is usually unable to explore other expensive brain activity solutions that exist now. The brain data is analysed to look for anomalies in pattern that indicate brain disorders like Epileptic seizures. This kind of early detection helps in doing pre-emptive action and sending out alerts/SOS. The brain wave data is also used to analyse the mental state of the user, their concentration levels and stress levels. At a time when the working population suffers from stress related issues and sleeping disorders due to a fastpaced lifestyle, NeuroBuds can be used as a mental health monitor. Once the application has enough data coming in from different users, it can recognize patterns and optimize algorithms on its own using the underlying neural network. NeuroBuds serves as the perfect link between the user and the smartphone to monitor other body vitals including heartbeat.

Dr. R A Mashelkar, Chairperson, Research Advisory Committee, SRISTI and NIF, honored Nitin Vasanth, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Cochin University of Science & Technology, Cochin, with the prestigious BIRAC-SRISTI Gandhian Young Technological Innovation (GYTI) Award 2017 at Rashtrapati Bhavan.

Design & Development of Automated Five Axis CNC Ball End Magnetorheological Finishing Machine

Dilshad Ahmad Khan and his team member Faiz Iqbal, Zafar Alam won the Appreciation award for the project Design & Development of Automated Five Axis CNC Ball End Magnetorheological Finishing Machine. He carried his project work under the guidance of Dr. Sunil Jha, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi.

The project is an innovation and technology based work aimed at providing nano level finish on various materials of complex shapes and size. This project is related to the design and development of a fully automated five axis CNC ball end magnetorheological finishing (BEMRF) setup from the conceptual idea to an industry standard machine. The developed machine caters to the demand of today's advanced industries which deals in finishing of 3-D dies, high precision lenses, orthopaedic implants, jewelleries and gems etc. In the first phase of the project an idea is conceptualized to finish 3-D complex surfaces using magnetorheological polishing (MRP) fluid. After checking the feasibility of the concept, a BEMRF tool is developed which is later mounted on a CNC machine setup. The newly developed finishing process is used to finish ferromagnetic as well as nonmagnetic materials of complex shapes and sizes using specially prepared magnetorheological polishing fluid. Apart from nano finishing on the surfaces, the measurement of surface roughness of the workpiece is also needed to be wear free which is not the case in stylus based measurement systems. Therefore, a non-contact roughness measurement instrument (confocal sensor) is incorporated in BEMRF machine. The confocal sensor is light, compact and easily mounted on the BEMRF tool for quick and error free measurement of surface roughness after the BEMRF process. In BEMRF machine the forces can be controlled automatically thereby enabling the user to select suitable force according to the material to be finished.

Anil Sahasrabudhe, Chairman of the All India Council for Technical Education, honored Dilshad Ahmad Khan, research scholar, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, with the prestigious Gandhian Young Technological Innovation (GYTI) Appreciation award 2017  at Rashtrapati Bhavan.

 

Low Cost Automated Handheld Melamine Detection Device (for Testing Melamine in Milk)

Students of the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore Dhiraj Indana including his team member S.C.G. Kiruba Daniel, Varun S, Prateek Katare who worked under the guidance of Dr. Sai Siva Gorthi received the Gandhian Young Technological Innovation Award-2017 for developing a prototype of a Low Cost Automated Handheld Melamine Detection Device (for Testing Melamine in Milk).

Device_PhotoEven though a number of kits and devices are available for detecting common milk adulterants like urea, boric acid, water, sugar and detergents, there is hardly any portable device available for the detection of melamine. Till now, bulky instruments like Gas Chromatography (GC), HPLC, GC-MS and LC-MS are being used for detecting melamine which costs between 25 to 50 lakhs rupees, as well as requiring skilled personnel for operation. A fully automated handheld device to detect melamine from milk with integrated milk pre-processing step done using chemical dried cotton is developed. Melamine is finally detected through interference in Silver nanoparticle formation. Both the preprocessing and detection steps are innovative and patented. The cost of the device may be few thousand rupees which is almost 1000 times lesser than the price of existing conventional instruments. The developed device is user-friendly Low Cost Automated Handheld Melamine Detection Device (for Testing Melamine in Milk) which can give the level of melamine adulteration in ppm directly. Thus, the device not only tells the user whether the milk is fit for consumption or not but also gives the exact concentration of melamine in milk. This device fulfills the goal of taking melamine sensing to every household so as to protect every person from melamine adulteration.

For this innovation Dr. R A Mashelkar, Chairperson, Research Advisory Committee, SRISTI and NIF, honored Dhiraj Indana, Department of Nano Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, with the prestigious BIRAC-SRISTI Gandhian Young Technological Innovation (GYTI) Award 2017 at a function held at Rashtrapati Bhawan on March 5.

Near Infrared Fluorescence Probes for Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease

K. Rajasekhar and Kavita Shah received the award for the research project Near Infrared Fluorescence Probes for Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. He carried his research work under the guidance of Prof. T. Govindaraju, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research (JNCASR), Bengaluru at a function held at Rashtrapati Bhawan on March 5.

K. RajasekharSelective detection and staining of toxic amyloid beta (Aβ) plaques found in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain is crucial for clinical diagnosis and monitoring of the disease progress. Herein, a coumarin-quinoline (CQ) conjugate-based molecular rotor type, turn-on near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence probe for selective and specific detection of Aβ fibrillar aggregates is designed. The probe CQ selectively binds to Aβ fibrillar aggregates over other toxic protein aggregates such as Tau, α-synuclein (α-Syn) and islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), and exhibit ~100 fold fluorescence enhancement with nanomolar binding affinity (82 nM). CQ effectively displace Thioflavin T bound to Aβ fibrillar aggregates and exhibit multiple binding sites on Aβ fibrillar aggregates which is extensively studied through fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and molecular docking. Remarkably, CQ unambiguously stains Aβ plaques in human brain tissue over its co-existing Tau aggregates, neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), which are strongly associated in AD and in various tauopathies. This is a highly desirable attribute to distinguish AD from disease conditions caused by Tau pathology.

Dr. Francis Gurry Director General of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) honored K. Rajasekhar, Department Biological Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research (JNCASR), Bengaluru, with the prestigious BIRAC-SRISTI Gandhian Young Technological Innovation (GYTI) Award 2017 at Rashtrapati Bhavan.​

Prophylactic Transdermal Patch Against Neurotoxin Poisoning In Biological Warfare Situations

Subham Banerjee won the award for the research project Prophylactic Transdermal Patch Against Neurotoxin Poisoning In Biological Warfare Situations. He carried her research work under the guidance of Dr. Pronobesh Chattopadhyay, Dr. Animesh Ghosh Defence Research Laboratory, Tezpur Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra.

Drug-in-adhesive matrix type combinational prophylactic transdermal patch composed of eserine and pralidoxime chloride (PAM) against acetyl choline agonist (±)-anatoxin a neurotoxin poisoning was developed. Initially, a simple RPHPLC method was developed and validated for the s imult aneous de t e rmina tion and quantification of eserine and 2-PAM using UV detection. The method was validated as per ICH guidelines for validation of analytical procedures, and was applied for the routine analysis of these two drugs in fabricated transdermal patches.

Product DesignAdhesive matrix type transdermal patches containing eserine and 2-PAM were prepared by solvent casting method. The drug combinations were incorporated in adhesive matrix type system supported by a polyester film laminate backing membrane and attached to a temporary releaseliner. The dermal patches were having desired properties such as thin, circular, opaque, smooth, homogeneous, sticky, uniform, flat and flexible in nature. The drug release was sustained from all the formulations up to 72 h and following anomalous (non-fickian) diffusion and fickian release mechanism for eserine and 2-PAM, respectively. Optimized transdermal patch exhibited highest acceptable levels of tackiness with good adherence capacity and showed promising stability potential with respect to all points of analysis. From safety point of view, the optimized transdermal patch was safe for application to the skin with no dermal and mutagenic toxicity as well. Pharmacodynamic study proved that the optimized transdermal patch was effective against acetyl choline agonist (±)-anatoxin a neurotoxin poisoning. While pharmacokinetic study revealed that the systemic absorption of the drugs from the fabricated best optimized patch through the skin was sufficient enough to achieve pharmacodynamic efficacy.

Dr. Prof. K. Vijay Raghavan Secretary, Department of Biotechnology honored Subham Banerjee, Defence Research Laboratory, Tezpur Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra, with the prestigious BIRAC-SRISTI Gandhian Young Technological Innovation (GYTI) Award 2017 at Rashtrapati Bhavan.

STERI-FREEZ: Flash Freeze Sterilization

Saugandha Das including her team member Archit Devarajan won the award for the research project STERI-FREEZ: Flash Freeze Sterilization. She carried her research work under the guidance of Prof. Padma V. Devarajan Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai.

STERI-FREEZ_IMAGE 1Surgical site infections are one of the most common complications associated with surgery, with reported incidence rates of 2-20%. The problem is enhanced in rural or under-resourced clinics in under-developed or developing countries with about one-third of surgical patients getting infected, a rate which is nine times greater than in developed countries. Of the various causes, the use of contaminated medical instruments that have not been properly cleaned and sterilized directly contribute to surgical site infections with around 20 million post-operative patients infected. In absence of proper sterilization and disinfection protocols or methods these situations may become life threatening. Rural clinics in developing countries cater to 3 billion people worldwide, but do not have minimum provisions necessary to prevent post-surgical infections. Considering India has over 60% of the population living in villages, this is a serious problem and hence needs great attention.

STERI-FREEZ_Schematic IMAGE 2Thus STERI-FREEZ provides an AMAZINGLY SIMPLE on-site technology, which provides a ready to use, economic yet effective solution to the existing lacuna. This portable, cold sterilization device comprises of an insulator box housing a metallic vessel covered with a lid containing a green cryogenic biocidal mixture or Flash Freeze Elixir (FFE). Sterilization is achieved using a combination of biocides acting at subzero temperatures (-70 degree Celsius). Surgical instruments to be sterilized are kept immersed in FFE and removed just prior to use without leaving any toxic residue on the surfaces. Conventional methods of medical sterilization (autoclave, hot air, chemical and gaseous sterilization) require energy intensive instruments and long processing time while alternative sterilization techniques (Boiling in water) are not considered effective enough.

Dr. Renu Swarup Senior Advisor, DBT and MD, BIRAC honored Saugandha Das, research scholar, Department of Medical Science & Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai and Archit Devarajan, research scholar, Department of Medical Science & Technology, Ramnarain Ruia college, Mumbai with the prestigious BIRAC-SRISTI Gandhian Young Technological Innovation (GYTI) Award 2017 at Rashtrapati Bhavan.

Targeted Theranostic Nanomedicines for Brain Cancer Therapy

Sonali Singh Doharey including her team member Rahul Pratap Singh, Poornima Agrawal won the award for the research project Targeted Theranostic Nanomedicines for Brain Cancer Therapy. She carried her research work under the guidance of Dr. M. S. Muthu, Prof. B. L. Pandey Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi.

Brain cancer is considered as one of the most devastating diseases because it is hard to treat and cure. Chemotherapy is the most common method for the treatment of different types of brain cancers. Unfortunately, the diagnosis and therapy of brain cancer are very unsatisfying because of the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which excludes more than 98% of small molecules and almost 100% of large molecules. Another obstacle in cancer therapy is to maintain the desired concentration of therapeutic agents and/or diagnostic agents at tumor site.

Sonali1The innovator developed targeted and controlled release nanomedicine systems including transferrin conjugated D-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) micelles and transferrin / arginine – glycine – aspartic acid (RGD) conjugated TPGS liposomes (i.e., transferrin conjugated liposomes and RGD conjugated liposomes) to deliver docetaxel (DTX) and quantum dots (QDs), simultaneously through receptor-mediated active delivery for brain cancer therapy. Innovator demonstrated that RGD or transferrin TPGS decorated theranostic liposomes were highly effective in delivering desired concentration of therapeutic agents and diagnostic agents across BBB without any signs of brain damage or edema in brain histopathology. These advanced platforms can diagnose brain cancer at early stages, initiate first-line therapy, monitor it, and if needed, rapidly start subsequent treatments. In future, brain theranostics will be able to provide personalized treatment which can make brain cancer even curable or at least treatable at the earliest stage.

Prof. Anil K Gupta, Co-ordinator, SRISTI and Founder, Honey Bee Network honored Sonali Singh Doharey, and her team, Department of Pharmacy, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, with the prestigious BIRAC-SRISTI Gandhian Young Technological Innovation (GYTI) Award 2017 at Rashtrapati Bhavan.

Revealed: Dual Functional Characteristics of Escherichia Coli Outer Membrane Protein Wzi And Its Implications In The Design Of Novel Antibiotics

Shivangi Sachdeva and Narendar Kolimi won the award for the research project Revealed: Dual Functional Characteristics of Escherichia Coli Outer Membrane Protein Wzi And Its Implications In The Design Of Novel Antibiotics. she carried her research work under the guidance of Dr Thenmalarchelvi Rathinavelan, Indian Institutes of Technology, Hyderabad. 

The emergence of multidrug resistance in bacteria is a major cause of infection and mortality worldwide. In Gram-negative bacteria, polysaccharide layers are one of the major virulent determinants that are involved in the evasion of host immune response as well as offers impermeability to antibiotics. Thus, inhibiting the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) biogenesis or surface exportation or its attachment to the bacterial surface may be an attractive strategy to generate avirulent Gram-negative bacterial strains. Here, the focus is on multidrug resistant Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli), which is a common cause for urinary tract infections (including infections in the kidney), bloodstream infection, intra-abdominal infections such as peritonitis, skin and soft tissue infections, neonatal meningitis, diarrhea and food borne infections.

An E.coli outer membrane protein Wzi that acts as an anchor for CPS onto the bacterial surface (viz., a lectin) also exhibits a bidirectional passive water conduction property (viz., a porin). Such a dual functional role of Wzi was not realized earlier due to the occluded pore, a property that can be used to treat E. coli infections. It is observed that three water specific entry points across extracellular face regulate the water diffusion involving different mechanisms and a luminal hydrophobic plug governs water permeation across the channel. Thus, a drug molecule that can either interfere with the water conduction by Wzi or the attachment of CPS to Wzi may aid in reducing the bacterial virulence and make them susceptible to antibiotics or host immune response

Dr. R A Mashelkar, Chairperson, Research Advisory Committee, SRISTI and NIF, honored Shivangi Sachdeva, Narendar Kolimi, research scholar, , with the prestigious BIRAC-SRISTI Gandhian Young Technological Innovation (GYTI) Award 2017  at Rashtrapati Bhavan.

A Novel Hybrid System for Textile Dye Waste Water Treatment

Bhaskar Bethi won the award for the research project A Novel Hybrid System for Textile Dye Waste Water Treatment. He carried his research work under the guidance of Dr. Shirish Hari Sonawane Department of Chemical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Warangal.

In this project, Ultrasonic irradiation is used to initiate the emulsion polymerization to form hydro gel through the generation of free radicals as well as the uniform distribution of clay across the hydro gel polymer matrix. Recently, some attempts have been made to modify the properties of polymeric hydrogels by the incorporation of nano- or micro-particles of inorganic materials, such as montmorillonite, kaolin, mica, bentonite into the polymer networks. Hydro gels loaded with dispersed clays are a new class of composite materials which combine elasticity and permeability of the gels with high ability of the clays to adsorb different substances. The developed hybrid system for the treatment of dye waste water can be easily scaled up to industrial scale for the treatment of bulk volume of textile wastewater. It is due to its simplicity in design, less cost of material construction, low cost of operation and higher cavitation yield compared to the ultrasounic cavitation. The developed technology will be efficient for the removal of dye from aqueous medium with in short duration of operating time compared to the most of the conventional treatment techniques such as biological wastewater treatment as well as the single treatment techniques include adsorption, coagulation etc. This innovative technology mainly involves unique feature of both the degradation and subsequent absorption of dye organic pollutants from the waste water in a single set of unit.

Dr. Prof. K. Vijay Raghavan, Secretary, Department of Biotechnology, honored Bhaskar Bethi, research scholar, Department of Chemical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Warangal, with the prestigious BIRAC-SRISTI Gandhian Young Technological Innovation (GYTI) Award 2017  at Rashtrapati Bhavan.

Atomic power plant leak – Pallava Bagla

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MUMBAI, Mar 19 (PTI): In a highly guarded Indian nuclear reactor complex, toughened radiation resistant pipes have contracted ‘small pox’. As a consequence, literally in a plot similar to a Bollywood thriller Indian scientists are burning the midnight oil to unravel the mysterious nuclear leak at the Kakrapar Nuclear Power Plant in Gujarat. This 21st century atomic pot boiler is actually unfolding through the hard work of scientists, who actually share a wall with the famous property where renowned Bollywood film star Raj Kapoor used to live.

Here, they are working over-time to find out the real cause of the cryptic leaks at twin reactors in southern Gujarat. To avoid any panic and any further accidents, the Indian nuclear watchdog – the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) – has shut down the affected plants till the cause has been found. Nuclear experts say pipes, made from a rare alloy, have contracted what seems like ‘small pox’ and this contagion has spread all over the critical tubes in two Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWR) at Kakrapar in Gujarat.And, to make the matters worse, after more than a year into the investigation, the teams of scientists really do not understand what has gone wrong.

It was on the morning of March 11, 2016, and as fate would have it exactly five years after the Fukushima reactors in Japan started exploding, unit number 1 of the 220-MW PHWR at Kakrapar developed a heavy water leak and had to be shut down in an emergency.

The indigenously built nuclear plant suffered a heavy water leak in its primary coolant channel and a plant emergency was declared at the site. No worker was exposed and no radiation leaked outside the plant, confirmed India’s Department of Atomic Energy. India’s nuclear operator, Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited (NPCIL) said “reactor had shut down safely” and “no radiation leaked out”. It confirmed that safety systems had functioned normally.

The atomic thriller really begins when experts are trying to find out why a leak recognition system failed, in the first place it should have given an alarm. “There is a leak detection system in place in all PHWRs, but in this case it failed to detect the leak on March 11, 2016,” confirms AERB Chairman S A Bhardwaj. AERB speculates that the crack developed so rapidly that the electronic leak detection system just did not had the time to react. Subsequent investigations revealed that the leak detection system was fully functioning and the operator had “NOT shut it down” to cut costs.

Nothing in the core of a nuclear reactor can be done in a jiffy and several weeks after the first leak, initial probe using a specially designed tool revealed that four big cracks had formed on a coolant tube which led to the massive leak.

The discovery of the crack was only the beginning of the mystery, further efforts to find the root cause established that the outside of the tube, the part which was not exposed to high temperature heavy water, was also for some unexplained reason “corroded”.

This was a stunning discovery, since the outside of the failed tube was exposed only to high temperature carbon dioxide and there had been no recorded case of a similar corrosion having been seen on the outside of any tube. It is also very hard to access this part since the space was very tiny in the annulus.

The AERB then ordered that all the tubes made out of a special alloy of zirconium-niobium be checked on the outside, to their surprise, they discovered that the contagion of the “nodular corrosion” or what in layman’s language can also be described as “small pox-like” was very widespread in many of the 306 tubes. Tubes made from the same batch and used at other Indian reactors continue to operate faithfully, without corrosion. The needle of suspicion now pointed to the carbon dioxide, a gas known to be very stable in high radiation environments.

A further post mortem revealed that the Unit-2 which is twin of the affected reactor had also been affected by a similar leak on July 1, 2015 almost ten months before the Unit 1 had a sudden appalling failure in March 2016. Investigations into why the Unit-2 failed were ongoing but no conclusive result had been found. This literally back-to-back failure of two fully functional nuclear reactors befuddled the engineers.

Unrelenting in trying to find out the root cause, the AERB ordered that entire assembly and not just the affected tube be safely pulled out and brought to India’s foremost nuclear laboratory, the Bhabha Atomic Research Center (BARC) in Mumbai for detailed failure analysis. It is this laboratory located at Trombay in Chembur, in Mumbai that shares geography with India’s famous Bollywood Kapoor family. In addition, since India operates another 16 similar nuclear plants, a full-fledged investigation was carried out on the coolant channels of all atomic power plants and lo-and-behold the investigating team found that the “small pox” like corrosion was confined only to the two units that operated at Kakrapar.

While this gave a sigh of relief to the NPCIL but it increased the complexity on trying to unravel the true cause of the leaks at Kakrapar. Today, Bhardwaj says the investigators are wondering if the carbon dioxide used in Kakrapar may have been contaminated which caused the “nodular corrosion” on the outside of the pipes.

The source of the carbon dioxide was further back traced and it seems only the Kakrapar plant was sourcing its gas from a “Naptha cracking unit” and possibly it has some contamination of hydrocarbons. No conclusive evidence on the contamination has been forthcoming and forensic analysis is still under way.

As it turns out nuclear engineers are masters of book-keeping especially when ageing of equipment is concerned and a more detailed check in the history of the plants revealed that in 2012 two tubes had been extracted from the Kakrapar plant as part of routine maintenance and had been safely stored in a safe warehouse. When these were re-examined in 2017, the investigators were surprised that the “small pox” like corrosion on the exterior of the tube was not present.

This now makes the investigators suspect that something went wrong after 2012. Meanwhile, the AERB and the atomic energy establishment has also reached out to the vast global nuclear community to try and help resolve this mystery.

The global watchdog the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna and ten other global forums have been informed that a mysterious leak is dogging the Indian reactors at Kakrapar and if the global community could be of some help. The international community is as much at a loss in explaining the failures as are the Indian teams. India operates 18 PHWR reactors and over the years it has accumulated some 348 years of operating experience of these unique nuclear plants powered using natural uranium and in all these years, the Department of Atomic Energy asserts no radiation related death has taken place at any nuclear plant and no radiation has ever leaked out of the Indian PHWR’s.

In addition to it, 29 PHWRs are today functional in Canada, Argentina, Romania, China, South Korea and Pakistan and none have reported any issue like the ‘small pox like corrosion’ on any of its nuclear plants.

Bharadwaj says right now there are only hunches but teams at BARC are exposing the Zircalloy tubes to carbon dioxide spiked with various contaminants and they are being placed in a high radiation environment to accentuate the aging process to try and determine the exact cause of the two processes—“small pox like nodular corrosion and the development of cracks in the coolant tubes.” These could be linked or independent, says Bhardwaj, who feels that in the next few months, the root cause will definitely be deciphered till then the reactors will remain shut.

India currently operates 22 nuclear reactors with an installed capacity of 6,780 MW and hopes to ramp up nuclear output to 32,000 MW by 2032. Meanwhile, the continuing nuclear mystery is giving the vast Indian nuclear establishment and its atomic sleuths ‘nuclear jitters’.

By – Pallava Bagla

Comments by Prof. Anil Gupta

a) non-uniform alloy itself, that is if alloy has been made in batches , then some batches may have had slight difference leading to patches like distortion; b) using an analogy of with disease in chickpea, where the fungus exists among roots of healthy plants also but disease manifest only in patches, probably because of changing c/n or c/p ( carbon phosph or nitrogen) ratio in those patches; the root cause may be more widely prevalent but problem may come in patches, c) is it possible that surface physics has to explain the problem.

Rotary ultrasonic Bone Drilling

Dr. Vishal Gupta received the award for the research project Rotary ultrasonic Bone Drilling. He carried his research work under the guidance of Prof. Pulak Mohan Pandey Mechanical Engineering Department, IIT Delhi.

Bone drilling is one of the steps in a typical surgical operation i.e. performed around the world for reconstruction and repair of the fractured bone. Fracture of bones is a common problem due to age factors, sports injuries, transport and industrial accidents, etc.There is always a necessity to minimize the magnitude of drilling force and torque during the bone drilling process. Thus, to minimize the rise in temperature, force and torque during surgical bone drilling process for more efficient and successful orthopaedic and trauma surgery. To attain the aforesaid, a new noble bone drilling method has been introduced recently named as RUBD. In the present research, a novel bone drilling technique i.e., rotary ultrasonic bone drilling named as RUBD has been successfully attempted to minimize the forces, torque temperature and microcracks during bone drilling. In order to perform the experimental investigations to find out change in temperature, force, torque, temperature and microcracks with RUBD using diamond coated hollow tool on bone, rotary ultrasonic tool assembly was designed and fabricated in house.

The drilling experiments were planned and carried out on porcine bones using design of experiments (Response Surface Methodology). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was carried out to find the effect of process factors such as rotational speed, feed rate, drill diameter and ultrasonic vibrational amplitude on the force and torque. Statistical models were developed for the force and torque with 95% confidential interval and confirmation experiments have been carried out to validate the models. The results of microcracks by SEM revealed that RUBD process offered a lower force, torque, temperature and minimum microcracks, making it a potential process for bone drilling in orthopaedic surgery. It was also found that RUBD generated a much lower temperature, force and torque as compared to the CSBD.

Dr. R A Mashelkar, Chairperson, Research Advisory Committee, SRISTI and NIF, honored Dr. Vishal Gupta, with the prestigious BIRAC-SRISTI Gandhian Young Technological Innovation (GYTI) Award 2017 at Rashtrapati Bhavan.

A Virtual Reality (VR)-based Immersive Simulator for Endoscopy Training

Shanthanu Chakravarthy received the award for the research project "A Virtual Reality (VR)-based Immersive Simulator for Endoscopy Training". He carried his research work under the guidance of Prof. G. K. Ananthasuresh, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru.

Virtual Reality (VR) together with haptics offers an immersive and flexible platform for training doctors in medical procedures. In this project, a VR-based endoscopy simulator together with the force-feedback system is developed. Endoscopy is minimally invasive and is used as an important diagnostic tool to detect abnormal tissues, ulcers, tumours, polyps, cancers, etc. Gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, including colonoscopy, is a complex procedure involving a high degree of hand-eye coordination.


These procedures are generally carried out by highly skilled clinicians. In order to practice endoscopy safely, a training system that does not involve patients is deemed important. VR-based training system developed in this work has many advantages. It is economical over a long run and usable any number of times; the training model can be changed and designed as per requirements including the incorporation of in-situ cases. It can be used for quantitatively assessing skill as recorded training sessions can be used for identifying mistakes. The developed endoscopy simulator also has many novel features. It consists of a three Degree of Freedom (DoF) haptic device, force models for real-time interaction, computer graphic models for visualization, and an ins t rumented endoscope for reali s tic interactions.Shanthanu Chakravarthy3

All the units of the simulator are uniquely integrated to provide immersive endoscopy s imulation. The device is kinematically designed to mimic real endoscopy. Furthermore, the endoscopy simulator developed in this project has the potential for extension to other interventional procedures such as colonoscopy, bronchoscopy, and endovascular training.

Dr. Francis Gurry Director General of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) honored Dr. Vikram Singh, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, with the prestigious BIRAC-SRISTI Gandhian Young Technological Innovation (GYTI) Award 2017 at Rashtrapati Bhavan.​

White Light Emission from Vegetable Extracts

Dr. Vikram Singh received the award for the research project White Light Emission from Vegetable Extracts. He carried his research work under the guidance of Prof. Ashok Kumar Mishra, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras.

White light emission (WLE) is generated from natural dyes extracted in the laboratory using a green and simple procedure. The optimized mixture of vikram singhtwo suitably chosen plant extracts using acidic ethanol, aided by a FRET cascade from polyphenolics to curcumin to anthocyanins, generates almost pure white light, with CIE values of (0.35, 0.33) in solution, (0.26, 0.33) in gelatin gel and (0.33, 0.25) in PVA film. The colour temperature of the WLE is conveniently tunable by simply adjusting the concentrations of the component emitters. The primary emitting pigments responsible for contributing to WLE are pol yphenol s and antho c y anins f rom pomegranate, and curcumin from turmeric. WLE from such cheap and nature friendly resources could be important in the context of lighting and sensing application. It would be interesting to see if such system can be used as dyes for tunable dye laser applications. Given the vast number of excellent natural fluorescent dyes obtainable from renewable biosources, approaches similar to the present could lead to a more extensive range of low-cost and efficient WLE biomaterials with ease of adjusting colour temperature, which will obviate more expensive alternatives currently being pursued.

Dr. R A Mashelkar, Chairperson, Research Advisory Committee, SRISTI and NIF, honored Dr. Vikram Singh, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, with the prestigious BIRAC-SRISTI Gandhian Young Technological Innovation (GYTI) Award 2017 at Rashtrapati Bhavan.

BioInvest 2017 in Bengaluru, April 04, 2017

BioInvest2017

BioInvest 2017 in Bengaluru, April 04, 2017

Greetings from ABLE!

 

I am writing this to invite you to join as at BioInvest 2017!

 

Association of Biotechnology Led Enterprises (ABLE) is organizing a one day BIOINVEST conclave on April 04, 2017 at Shangri-La Hotel, Bengaluru. The aim of the conference is to provide the networking platform for the Lifescience Start-ups,Institutional investors, Investment Bankers, Financial sponsors, and the industry to explore market opportunities and understand sectoral trends.

 

BioInvest conferences are by invitation only. Feel free to contact my colleague Pavana Praveen at pavanapr@ableindia.org.in

 

REGISTRATION CATEGORY

You can join as at BioInvest under one of the following three categories:

(i) As a Company Seeking Investment (Start-up)

(ii) As an Investor

(iii) As a  Delegate

 

REGISTRATION FEE & CRITERIA

(i) Companies Seeking Investment: Registration Fees

  • Rupees Five Thousand (Rs 5000 /- for a maximum of two people from the organization)

  • 16 companies get a  seven minute  (7 minute) opportunity to make their pitch

  • Companies will be selected by ABLE Panel after assessing the start-ups requirement and profile

(ii) Delegate Registration Fee

  • No fee

  • Only 30 seats available.

  • Entry on first-come first-serve basis.

  • Once shortlisted, invitation is not transferable.

  • No walk-in entry

 

(iii) Investor Registration Fee

  • No fee

  • Only limited seats available.

  • Entry on first-come first-serve basis.

 

REGISTRATION FORM & DEADLINES

Find below the links to complete the registrations under the relevant category.Click to Register.

(i) Companies Seeking Investment: Registration Fees

(Deadline – March 17, 2017 to submit your application. March 21, 2017–Intimation by ABLE on shortlisted names and confirmation / Fee Payment)

(ii) Delegate Registration Fee

(Deadline – March 20, 2017)

 

(iii) Investor Registration Fee

(Deadline – March 21, 2017)

VENUE & SCHEDULE

Shangri-La Hotel, Bengaluru,
No 56-6B Palace Road, Bengaluru, 560052
Event Timings: 1030 – 1640 Hrs on Tuesday, April 04, 2017

IIT Kanpur: Students felicitated for developing Braille slate ~ indiatoday.in

Students of the Indian Institute of Technology-Kanpur (IIT-K) were given the Gandhian Young Technological Innovation Award-2017 for developing a prototype of a Braille slate called 'Anubhav' at a function held at Rashtrapati Bhawan on March 5.

Gandhian Young Technological Innovation (GYTI) Awards celebrates the spirit of student innovation in all the fields of engineering, science, technology and design through extremely affordable/frugal solution or the ones pushing the technological edge.

As per an HT report, there were 2,715 nominations from 308 institutions and universities from 27 states and two Union Territories across 54 different subject disciplines. This year, 22 innovations were selected for the award and another 17 for appreciation. 

First device to help visually impaired read and write simultaneously:

The idea was to develop 'Anubhav' was initiated by Sachin NP and Vimal Chandru, design programme students who worked under the guidance of Prof Shantanu Bhattacharya. According to them there was no single device that could help the visually impaired read and write simultaneously before this.

Sachin, who graduated from IIT-K and is currently working with a German company, said: "The award is a reward for our hard work. It will inspire us to do more innovation and bring about a change in society. Technology should be used for the betterment and welfare of society."

 "So we thought of sorting out the issue. The idea was to make a single device that can perform the functions of both the Braille slate and the Taylor's board," said Sachin and Vimal.

87165 The Braille slate has two polymer-based pads hinged to one side, a single row of metal stencil with Braille cell patterns etched on it and an ergonomic stylus with a hollow cylindrical tube.

'Anubhav' consists of cells with raised dots arranged on a slate and a stencil that slides down vertically from one row to the other. Using the hollow-tube stylus, the raised dots can be embossed on a paper placed between the pads. 8041IMG_20160503_164708

"The device has been tested with visually impaired children in Kanpur (Andh Vidyalaya students), and the results have been very encouraging," claimed Sachin, adding, "This project has been in progress for the past one year. 'Anubhav' was the result of thorough research. Now, we are trying to approach the state government to make this product available in the market."

Source : http://indiatoday.intoday.in/education/story/iit-kanpur/1/899503.html

Carbon Zero Challenge

The Carbon Zero Challenge is a pioneering initiative by IIT Madras and IWMA in collaboration with the US Consulate General, Chennai. CZEROC seeks innovative ideas and proof-of-concept solutions from students and entrepreneurs in Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Karnataka, Puducherry, and the Andaman and Nicobar Islands.