X-niff: Microcantilever based Electronic-nose platform for airborne chemical vapor sensing applications.

Four young engineers of the premier institute of IIT Bombay, Gaurav Gupta, Vijay S Palaparthy, Shambhulingayya Ningayya Doddapujar & Pallabi Das developed X-niff: Microcantilever based Electronic-nose platform for airborne chemical vapor sensing applications with the help of their guides Prof. Valipe Ramgopal Rao & Prof. Maryam Shojaei Baghini.

Detection of explosives has been the holy grail of product development and research in the personnel and parameter security space for the past two decades. The alarming rise in use of chemically explosive compounds such as RDX, TNT and PETN by anti-social, anti-national and terrorist outfits for executing lethal attacks has led to an imminent need to detect the presence of these explosive materials quickly and accurately. Lethal as they are, these compounds have such low presence in vapour phase that sniffing them is a task assigned to only highly sensitive, trained.Gaurav Gupta

The past decade has seen several technologies emerge to replace dogs since they suffer from fatigue and loss in sensitivity due to changing environmental conditions; however, these products have been known to be bulky and very expensive, limiting their use to only airports and high security zones in the country. A project team led by Prof Ramgopal Rao at IIT-B has been working on developing cost-effective and portable technologies for detection of explosive compounds. The sensors, made of silicon compounds and polymers and coated with monolayers of receptor chemicals engineered to capture explosive compounds, could detect the presence of explosives at concentrations as low as only a few molecules, making them as sensitive as a sniffer dog. These micro sensors are small enough to be integrated into portable hand-held metal detectors, adding a huge edge to personnel security scanning systems. Recently, the project team has developed the advanced sensing platform called X-niff which is the integrated multichannel electronic nose (e-nose) platform developed at IIT-Bombay for detecting and indentifying the trace level of explosives among various interferents with high level of sensitivity and selectively. In principal, it consist of three main components: sensor array for response collection to targeted analyte, related electronics circuit to detect and collect the sensor response and pattern recognition software to analyse andrecognise the particular analyte based on the sensor response pattern. The developed system works in the close resemblance to human nose hence the name.Gaurav Gupta1

For this X-niff: Microcantilever based Electronic-nose platform for airborne chemical vapor sensing applications, they received Gandhian Young Technology Innovation Award 2016 organized by BIRAC-SRISTI at Rashtrapati Bhawan, New Delhi.

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3D-printed hydroxyapatite tray for segmental mandibular bone reconstruction by stem cell delivery for oral cancer patients

A young engineer of the premier institute of IIT Delhi, Ms. Sanskrita Das developed a 3D printed hydroxyapatite tray for segmental mandibular bone reconstruction by stem cell delivery for oral cancer patients under guidance of her PhD guide Dr. Sourabh Ghosh.

A 3D-printing technique, called direct write assembly, is utilized to develop custom-made hydroxyapatite filaments fused together in the form of a tray and loaded with autologous stem cells, which is implanted for mandibular reconstruction after surgical resection of the tumour. The recorded Oral  Health Quality Of Life is satisfactory showing no signs of immune rejection. Thus to solve the problems associated with large mandibular defects, titanium reconstruction plate with the adhered hydroxyapatite tray offers a versatile tool for patient-specific oromandibular reconstruction for functional oral and mandibular rehabilitation.

3D printed hydroxyapatite constructsimplanted hydroxyapatite tray

For this 3D-printed hydroxyapatite tray for segmental mandibular bone reconstruction by stem cell delivery for oral cancer patients, she received Gandhian Young Technology Innovation Award 2016 organized by BIRAC-SRISTI at Rashtrapati Bhawan, New Delhi.

Automatic urine and fecal disposal system

Four young engineers of Sahrdaya College of Engineering and Technology, Neenu Jose, Athul.K.Raj, Athira.K.R & Neenu.P developed a Automatic urine and fecal disposal system with the help of their guides Prof. Jinu.Sebastian & Prof. Jimin Jose.Automatic urine and fecal disposal system
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bedridden patients always require help in their ablutions and hence are dependent on others. Sometimes, this leads to unhygienic conditions. Therefore, an automatic urine and fecal disposal system has been presented for bedridden patients. It helps in the improvement of the method required for proper disposal and cleaning of bedridden patients.
It is based on switch mechanism for bedridden patients to excrete independently. The main control system is implemented by using electric drive mode and by mechanical movements of bed. Here, the bed is partitioned mainly into two parts. The first part possesses linear as well as angular patient gets seated on the toilet provided below the bed. From here, the waste is bio decomposed. For proper degradation of the waste, two methods can be implemented — bio-degradation or thermal degradation.
Since it is degraded it can be used as a biomanure so as to favour an eco-friendly environment. A pressurised water gun, along with a blower system, is equipped for cleaning. The system is easy to handle since it employs only an electric drive mode.

 

For this Automatic urine and fecal disposal system, they received Gandhian Young Technology Innovation Award 2016 organized by BIRAC-SRISTI at Rashtrapati Bhawan, New Delhi.

 

Rapid endotoxin entrapment and detection on surface-engineered glass substrates

Three young engineers of the premier institute of IIT Delhi,  Prasanta Kalita, Nitish Goel & Ruchika Sharma developed a Rapid endotoxin entrapment and detection on surface-engineered glass substrates with the help of their guides Dr. Shalini Gupta & Dr. V. Sritharan. 
Rapid endotoxin entrapment and detection on surface-engineered glass substrates1Endotoxin or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major constituent of the Gramnegative bacterial cell wall that causes a life-threatening disorder – septicemia — resulting from unregulated activation of innate immune system. Thus, a simple colourimetric assay for the detection of LPS in human blood/sera and water is developed. Here, LPS is captured from an analyte on a long-chain silane-functionalised glass substrate and tagged with gold nanoparticle (GNP) probes, surface-engineered with a narrow-spectrum antibiotic drug — polymyxin B — that has high specificity for LPS molecules. The signal sensitivity after GNP binding is further amplified using a 30-second silver reduction step that produces colourimetric spots in theupper femto-molar range but still visible to the naked eye. The colour intensity is also quantified using an LED smartphone-based optical acquisition system and a MATLAB image-processing code. The enhancement of net sensitivity of detection beyond the clinical limit to allow pre-symptomatic (subclinical) stage monitoring and screening is performed. A calibration curve is also generated from spiked endotoxin levels to determine their unknown concentration in clinical samples. The results are found to be benchmarked to a commercial ELISA kit and other patient data (microbiology, CBC, haematology reports etc.). The overall approach is found to be simple, sensitive, robust and cost-effective, suggesting great utility for clinical usage.

For this a Rapid endotoxin entrapment and detection on surface-engineered glass substrates, they received Gandhian Young Technology Innovation Award 2016 organized by BIRAC-SRISTI at Rashtrapati Bhawan, New Delhi.

 

 

Energy efficient combined process of microbial fuel cell (MFC) and membrane bioreactor (MBR) for high efficiency and reliable treatment of organic wastewater

Two young engineers of the premier institute of IIT Kharagpur, Sreemoyee Ghosh Ray & Gourav Dhar Bhowmick developed a Energy efficient combined process of microbial fuel cell (MFC) and membrane bioreactor (MBR) for high efficiency and reliable treatment of organic wastewater with the help of their guide Prof. M. M. Ghangrekar.A lab-scale set-up of MFC-MBR1
Currently available MBR technology is highly expensive and has a limitation to achieve the required treatment efficiency for inland surface water disposal or to utilise the effluent for irrigation without further treatment. Therefore, a twostage continuous process is developed, combining MFC and submerged MBR, with intermittent suction of high-quality effluent through ultrafiltration membrane, which can be used for treatment of sewage as well as medium-strength industrial wastewater and consequently, generate high-quality effluent and bioelectricity in this process.
The air-cathode MFC is constructed with a low-cost ceramic cylinder, considered as the anodic chamber. Acetone is used as a mixing solvent. Untreated carbon felt is used as anode and cathode current collector. The MFC is kept in an open environment under the influence of fluorescent light. Synthetic wastewater with sucrose as carbon source is introduced in MFC and effluent is continuously collected in the aerobic MBR.
Schematic diagram of the idea of wastewater treatment using MFC-MBR2
Further, submerged hollow fibreultrafiltration unit is attached inside the aeration tank and effluent extraction is carried out under constant membrane flux. The effluent is then collected in an aeration tank as a carbon/nutrient source for aerobic microorganisms. Effluent from the tank is extracted by high-permeate flux through hollow fibre-ultra filtration membrane followed by frequent membrane back flushing.

For this Energy efficient combined process of microbial fuel cell (MFC) and membrane bioreactor (MBR) for high efficiency and reliable treatment of organic wastewater, they received Gandhian Young Technology Innovation Award 2016 organized by BIRAC-SRISTI at Rashtrapati Bhawan, New Delhi.

 

Nstomoz Vascular anastomosis assist device

A young engineer of the premier institute of IIT Madras, Anand Parikh has developed a Nstomoz Vascular anastomosis assist device with the help of his guides Prof Venkatesh Balasubramanian and Dr. V.B. Narayanamurthy.

Connecting  vascular tissues is a common practice in many fields of surgeries. For the tissue to survive, its donor vessels need to be connected to the corresponding recipient blood vessels. This process is known as vascular anastomosis . Presented here, is an anastomotic assist device to enable surgeons of all specialties to perform anastomosis faster, safer and with an easier learning curve.

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Vascular clamps, while preventing blood from flowing into the field of surgery, causes collapse of the blood vessel lumen thus, creating a bottleneck for manipulating and suturing delicate vasculature. This novel technology keeps the lumen open to surgeon’s view while simultaneously clamping the blood vessel. This greatly de-skills the process by allowing the surgeon to suture with minimal manipulation of the vessel, thereby reducing the possibility of vessel damage and saving pricey operation theatre (OT) time lost during manipulation.

 

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It has leveraged the efficiency of sutures and eliminated its biggest flaw, in order to create a reusable, sterilisable, easy-to-use alternative to vascular clamps whose operation is majorly aligned with the standard technique. This is achieved at a low price. It combines frugality with quality, by providing better care to patients with lower occupational hazards to surgeons thereby generating greater value for all.

For this Nstomoz Vascular anastomosis assist device, he received Gandhian Young Technology Innovation Award 2016 organized by BIRAC-SRISTI at Rashtrapati Bhawan, New Delhi.

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Development of a portable device based on polarised fluorescence for detection of cervical pre-cancer

Cancer is killing more than 8 million people worldwide and given the current lifestyle of this generation, the numbers are only bound to rise.

Two young engineers of the premier institute of IIT Delhi, Bharat Lal Meena & Dr Pravesh Mehra worked on development of a portable device based on polarized fluorescence for detection of cervical pre-cancer with the help of their guide Prof. Asima Prdhan.

In order to combat cervical cancer, a portable device to obtain the intrinsic fluorescence from human cervical tissue samples by measuring polarised fluorescence and polarised elastic scattering signals, has been developed. This device consists of a laser diode (405 nm) and white light source (Xe-lamp), to measure the polarised fluorescence and the polarised elastic-scattering spectra, respectively. Vertical polarised light falls on the sample and co- and cross-polarised fluorescence and elastic-scattering spectrum are measured by automated rotation of the analyser. Signal is subsequently collected through an optical fibre and directed towards miniature spectrometer. All data are collected at 180 degree angle (backscattering mode) with respect to incident-polarised light (as shown in attached image).5590Block_diagram_with_photograph_of_the_device

The sensitivity and the specificity for discrimination of pre-cancerous (CIN I, II and III; CIN: Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia) samples from normal samples are found to be 100%, with confidence interval of 99%. This portable device is costeffective, fast, accurate, minimally-invasive, and has the potential to become a part of the regular screening tools for in vivo detection of cervical cancer in the clinic.

 

Bharat lal meena

For this development of a portable device based on polarized fluorescence for detection of cervical pre-cancer, they received Gandhian Young Technology Innovation Award 2016 organized by BIRAC-SRISTI at Rashtrapati Bhawan, New Delhi.