The Paperfuge: A 20-Cent Device That Could Transform Health Care

An article in the Wired, brings into focus a paper and string arrangement which does not look like anything of value. However, the article calls this innovation by Manu Prakash , a bio-engineer from Stanford University,  a minor miracle. Prakash’s innovation is an inexpensive centrifuge, aptly called “Paperfuge”. Paperfuge is made of  paper, string and plastic and does not use electricity. It achieves 125000 rpm, enough to separate plasma from blood  an important step in many critical diagnosis tests. It does all this weighing 2 grams and costing less than 20 rupees.

 

Manu Prakash demonstrates how to use a Paperfuge, an ultra-affordable, hand-powered centrifuge made of paper and string.

Video: Manu Prakash demonstrates how to use a Paperfuge, an ultra-affordable, hand-powered centrifuge made of paper and string.PRAKASH ET AL.

A serial innovator, Prakash made believes in frugal science. He developed a folding paper microscope using origami in 2012.

This innovation has made available centrifuges, which can fit into pockets, to remote villages where power is uncertain.  For more details refer to the Wired article. (wired | 2017_10th_Jan)

Milk adulteration detection kit

Avisek Barla from Indian Insitute of Technology, Madras with the help of his team member Sameer Sharma, Srikiran Chandrasekaran, Junaid Babu, Aparajitha K and guide Dr Ashwin Mahalingam developed a Milk adulteration detection kit.

A paper strip through which tests for five adulterants (glucose, urea, detergent, starch and fat) can be done simultaneously has been developed. Ayan has been designed keeping the end user in mind. The unique selling proposition is the number of tests it can perform at a very low production cost of Rs 1.60.

milk-adulteration-detection-kitThe user needs to dip one end of the test strip in the milk and, through the natural capillary action, the milk reacts with the reagents in their respective reaction zones. The results can be seen through the change in colour that occurs. This is a capillary-type microfluidic device. The chemicals are printed on the paper using a normal inkjet printer. Paper as a
medium and chemicals in small quantity bring down the costs. Ayan pro is an industrial grade device which will sport a microfluidic chip, image processing unit and a spectrophotometer.scaled up prototype for testing has been developed.

For this invention, They received appreciation award in Gandhian Young Technological Innovation Award 2016 organized by SRISTI at Rashtrapati Bhawan, New Delhi.

Application of nanomaterial to analyse strength of concrete

Ms Dhafani Ishita & Mr Sadariya Gautam from Vyavasayi Vidya Pratishthan’s Sanch College of Engineering, Rajkot developed an Application of nanomaterial to analyse strength of concrete with the help of their guides Mr Hitesh Ashani & Dr Davit Dhruv.

Cement-based materials have poor mechanical properties and are highly permeable to water and other aggressive chemicals. This reduces their durability and strength. Nanotechnology is applied in understanding of the hydration of cement particles. There are various ways to incorporate nanotechnology into concrete that will greatly improve its desirable properties like durability, strength, ductility, cleanliness, etc. Fineness test, consistency test, initial and final setting time, and soundness test are done after the addition of these nanoparticles in cement and its properties are studied.application-of-nanomaterial-to-analyse-strength-of-concreteA substantial improvement in the mechanical properties and durability of cementation materials is observed with assimilation of nanomaterials such as nano-Al2O3, carbon nanotubes, etc. If the performance of the basic civil engineering raw materials is enhanced, the productivity will increase.

For this innovation an Application of nanomaterial to analyse strength of concrete, They received appreciation award in Gandhian Young Technological Innovation Award 2016 organized by SRISTI at Rashtrapati Bhawan, New Delhi.